Tag Archives: afghanistan

[Archive 05.02.12: House of Alchemy Special]

 

1) Afghanistan, “Cicada Song,” And Bide Your Time
2) Mister Matthew, “Innerspaced (excerpt),” Telecut Powers (Gift/Draft Tapes)
3) Digital Dog Party, “Life’s Intermission,”
4) Steve Baczkowski and Nola Ranallo, “Marrow Bird,” Live the Soundlab 
5) Rust Worship, “Side A (Excerpt),” Terrerestial Society (House of Alchemy)
6) Parashi, “Undulate,” Parashi/Chapels Splits (House of Alchemy)
7) Venn Rain, “The History of Things to Come,” Bioharmonics (House of Alchemy)
8) DeTrop, “Four Stages Apostasy (excerpt),” Man, Woman & Beast (House of Alchemy)
9) Mama Baer, “Track 1,” Perverted People Girl Fuckers (House of Alchemy)
10) Scott Valkwitch, “InfraRed Black Haze,” TBA (House of Alchemy)
11) Jason Lescalleet, “Accidental Orriental,” Electronic Music (RRR)
12) Hive Mind, “Side 1 (excerpt),” Elemental Disgrace (Spectrum Spools)
13) Yek Koo, “East Hollywood Studio,” A Plea for a Night Desert
14) Clay Cantrell, “Late Aster Girl,” The Tree Farmer (House of Alchemy)
15) Transplant Mountains, “So Shines a Good Deed in a Weary World (excerpt),” Transplant Mountains/Chapels Split (House of Alchemy)
16) Mundkrach & Kommissar Hjuler und Frau, “Track 3 excerpt,” A/N/T/I/Z/I/P/A/T/I/O/N (House of Alchemy)
17) Sheldon Siegel, “Side A excerpt”Midden (House of Alchemy)
18) Rambutan, “Midpoint (excerpt),” Rambutan/Fossils from the Sun Split (House of Alchemy)


[Review: Afghanistan, ‘And Bide Your Time’]

When it comes to artistic expression, Ithaca’s Keir Neuringer is not limited to a single mode or medium. A quick online survey of the multi-instrumentalist’s offerings reveals him to be equally comfortable in the worlds of free jazz–as an Ayler-inspired alto sax player–or in the world of twisted experimental folk– as a searing, fiery protest singer–and many worlds in between.

Throw on top of this his excursions into agitprop video production and you get an artist that is bursting at the seams to express all sorts of interesting (and politically charged) ideas and always in an unpredictable manner. In other words, the guy can do it all and on his latest offering as Afghanistan with And Bide Your Time he in fact does do it all. All five tracks were recorded in single live takes, no overdubs, with Neuringer, like an electrified troubadour, singing, playing farfisa organ, and drumming. All at the same time (see the below video).

[vimeo:http://vimeo.com/31447661%5D

It’s interesting to ponder Neuringer’s stylistic choice on And Bide Your Time. As an artist he is clearly comfortable communicating in various forms, and as a musician he has a number of options he can choose from when deciding how to convey an idea. It is thus thought provoking that the Afghanistan project is draped in a carnevelisque gypsy-folk sound almost akin to Man Man (but with less emphasis on baroquish funk and more on straight-ahead topical protest). Despite the topicality of his rage-filled lyrics, however, the musical atmosphere created by Neuringer–despite the few instruments at his disposal–reaches a surreal pitch. So much so that the combination of wavy farfisa and foot-stomping percussion calls to mind the memorable scene from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas where Depp and Del Toro struggle to escape from the absurdly horrifying Bazokoo Circus casino while loaded on all sorts of hallucinogens. At no time, however, does Neuringer’s music induce any sort of escapist mindset for the listener. This is not music designed to entertain or entrance you, but rather to confront you. His politically charged lyrics establish a commentary on the gruesome and grotesque nature of the world, bringing us closer to what is nothing more than a spectacle on television screens to most of us. The musical accompaniment he has crafted around those lyrics creates a cynical and satirical soundtrack for our ringleaders as they compel lions to jump through hoops and elephants to balance on balls.

Neuringer, however, does not only point his antipathy at the powers that be. His lyrics also serve as a mirror for his listeners and for those who share his political consciousness. In “Rocket Ships,” Neuringer laments, “You write letters but it’s not enough/So your march and protest and that other stuff/Yeah you get going when the going gets tough/And all that other stuff.” This feeling of futility that most who have strived to change the world inevitably feel at some time or another is dark stuff and, as with all the subject matter of his work, Neuringer confronts it head on, refusing to shy away.

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Review by Cameron Alexander